Review: The Faerie War by Rachel Morgan (An Empty Character Is a Glass With No Milk…)

Posted July 7, 2015 by Sophia
1 Comment

Review: The Faerie War by Rachel Morgan (An Empty Character Is a Glass With No Milk…)The Faerie War by Rachel Morgan
Creepy Hollow #3
Other Books: The Faerie Prince, A Faerie's Secret, A Faerie's Revenge
Published by Self-Published on March 20, 2015
Genres: Fantasy, Romance, Young Adult
Format: eBook
Source: Author

Driven by action, suspense, and a strong heroine, this deliciously detailed, bestselling YA fantasy will keep you turning the pages right up until the epic conclusion...

Violet Fairdale is in big trouble. Her home is gone, her beloved forest lies in ruins, the guy she gave her heart to has deserted her-and she doesn't remember any of it. The powerful Lord Draven is taking over, brainwashing guardians into fighting for him. No one is safe from the evil spreading throughout the fae world.

As alliances are forged between the remaining free fae, Vi struggles to reclaim her identity and figure out where she belongs in this new world. When someone from her past shows up, life gets more complicated. He brings with him a long-forgotten weapon and an ancient prophecy that places Vi at the center of the fight against Draven. With the future of the fae world at stake, can Vi carry out the prophecy's instructions before it's too late?

The author/publisher provided a free copy of the book for review purposes - thank you! Receiving a review copy does not guarantee a positive review and therefore do not affect the opinion or content of the review.

I find I actually enjoyed The Faerie War despite its differences to the first two books in the Creepy Hollow series. The third and final book in Violet’s story happens approximately a month after the events in The Faerie Prince, telling it from both Ryn’s and Violet’s view.

The Faerie War is… different, per say. Since Violet doesn’t have her memories this time around, Morgan seems to write in an entirely different way that I somehow find really weird. Violet isn’t the same as she is in the first two books – her memories are obviously gone, but I didn’t find much of Violet’s snarkiness, sass, and sarcasm that I find when I look back to the first books in the series. There are hints of the old Violet, but other than that, Morgan writes in a formal way that makes Violet seem quite distant, aloof, and empty.

Reading from Ryn’s view was a little confusing at first. It’s completely different from Violet’s as his side of the story goes way back when – just before the faerie world flips upside down and everything goes straight to hell. It took a while to actually figure out when his story started taking place and how it all worked, but after putting the pieces together, I actually enjoyed Ryn’s side of the story.

I was pretty disappointed when we went back to Violet’s part, knowing that Violet was going to be just as distant and aloof as she was when we first meet her in the third book. To my delight, she does become a more sassier and has a bit more sarcasm when we meet her once more, which fortunately doesn’t make her sound like an empty glass of milk.

“Does that mean you agree with me? You’re not angry with me? You … think my bony ankle makes a good pillow?”

The ending to The Faerie War and Violet’s story isn’t exactly mind-blowing. Violet’s confrontation with Draven seemed to mainly consist of Draven threatening Violet – not exactly my cup of tea. I still enjoyed the entire happily ever after aspect, but like with most endings these days… I’m just not feeling it.

Sophia is a socially awkward Communications major who has a GIF for nearly everything and is frequently in a Hogwarts House Crisis. More of her bookish reviews can be found at The Arts STL.

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